List All

Art

Early American Garden Bouquets by Julia Smith Berrall

In this expertly compiled and visually captivating history, Julia Smith Berrall traces the ever-changing relationship between Americans and their gardens from the 17th century through the Victorian era.

Goshen Revisited by Jack & Judy Witt

In this second book on Goshen Pass, Jack and Judy Witt combine forces again to revel in their love of each other and this land along Virginia’s Maury River.

Goshen: Lessons from the River by Jack & Judy Witt

The first in a series of works by Jack and Judy Witt, Goshen: Lessons From the River celebrates the natural beauty of Goshen Pass, along Virginia’s Maury River, and the powerful spiritual influence which this place has had upon their art and their lives.

The Woods of Wicomico by Nuala C. Galbari

During the hot, lazy days of summer, life in the woods of Wicomico is peaceful. Mukki the muskrat makes herbal teas, Cornelius the crow fruitlessly tries to take a midday nap, and young Timothy Trumble the tortoise marvels at the world around him. But when humans plan to build a new development in their woodland, the community of animals springs into action to save their homes.

Biography

A Better Man Edited by Kelly Johnson

The journey from childhood to manhood is a momentous and often difficult time in every boy’s life. Never has this transition been more challenging than it is today. In addition to the perennial trials of peer pressure, hormones and popularity, young men must now grapple with a media-saturated culture that places enormous emphasis on physical appeal, material wealth and celebrity status.

A Call to Mind: A Story of Undiagnosed Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury by Claire Galloway

"It was so easy to conclude that my son was a sensitive and dreamy child, unadept at sports. I could not see that this was yet another piece of a puzzle, the full picture of which would show an injured brain. Luke would continue to provide clues over the next ten or so years, some subtle and some quite obvious. If only we had known what to look for..."

A Live Controversy: Autism and a Family’s Determination By Joseph and Roxana Hartmann

Roxana and Joseph Hartmann’s struggle for an equal education for their autistic child is as riveting as it is heart rending. For twenty years, they fought for their son, Mark, to be included in classrooms where he would not be treated differently because of his disability.

A Rose for Raymonde by Wade H. Foy

So begins A Rose for Raymonde, the true story of a young Swiss nurse who immigrated to the United States and found love with a U.S. Navy Reserve officer in 1950s New York. Complete with photographs and personal letters, this book chronicles their lives before their paths crossed and after.

Danger on My Doorstep: The Anita Flora Powitzer Story by Linda Schubert

Berlin had been safe for Anita Powitzer for as long as she could remember. But when Hitler came to power, everything changed. Now policemen harmed instead of helped, and Anita couldn’t even talk to her best friend. Flung from her secure childhood into a fearful world, she and her family had to find a way to flee Berlin before it was too late.

Neck Tales: Stories from Virginia’s Northern Neck by Thea Marshall

Join National Public Radio commentator Thea Marshall for a historic and contemporary journey through Virginia’s Northern Neck. First broadcast by Ms. Marshall on NPR, these stories paint a vivid portrait of this part of Virginia that’s a world apart—from the region’s wine, watermen and Chantey singers, to its poets, patriots, kings and citizens.

Patton’s Forward Observers by John Kurt Reith

More than any other military figure, General George S. Patton Jr. conjures up the image of the ultimate World War II American warrior, and even today, the Patton mystique continues to grow. Despite his renowned egotism, Patton understood that it was the blood of his soldiers that earned the glory attributed to him. Patton’s Forward Observers is told by a unique collection of highly trained artillery observers who fought every step of the war with Patton’s famed Third Army.

The Chief and I by Karen Tootelian

Summer of 2002, writer/environmentalist Karen Tootelian began caring for the 89-year-old Chief of the Mattaponi Tribe, Webster Little Eagle Custalow. What began as her personal journals evolved into a book about their deep friendship and compassion for one another.

The Life of “P”: A Memoir of a Mother and a Nurse by Lee Rice

The Life of “P” is the memoir of a mother and a nurse—an unsung hero from a small town in Virginia’s historic Northern Neck whose personal struggles, courage and heroic sacrifice should be remembered.

Children’s Books

Bubble Duck and Bubble Duck Does Hockey by Teresa Pistole

Join Bubble Duck on his first adventures as he learns not to litter, plays ice hockey and makes new friends!

Coco’s Number Nightmare by Georgie E. Hanlin

Coco loves almost everything about third grade—except math! Coco’s friends adore playing multiplication games, which only makes her feel worse about math. After struggling with homework and losing a game in front of her whole class, Coco feels humiliated and has a TERRIBLE nightmare! In the dream, the Multiplication Monster laughs an evil laugh and attacks her in front of her classmates when she answers a problem wrong. Find out how Coco overcomes her fear of math, gets rid of the malicious Multiplication Monster, and learns the value of a teacher who believes in her.

Do Spiders Need Leggins When It’s Cold Outside? by Terri Sebastian

Do Spiders Need Leggins When it's Cold Outside?' is a bedtime story book full of animals and pirates. Along with the spider that needs leggins, author Terri Sebastian introduces readers to a silly old polka dot cat, a lady moose all dressed in red, and the pirate that lives in a closet inside a shoe with his crewmate, a little brown mouse.

Remembering for Both of Us by Charlotte Wood

Tasha loves her grandfather, and she knows that PaPa loves her. But lately, PaPa has begun to forget things. He’s often confused and upset. Sometimes, he doesn’t even recognize his own family. How can Tasha’s grandmother help her see that while PaPa is changing, his love for Tasha has not?

Simon and the Worry Watch by Susan M. Brown

Simon is excited about his first day of preschool, but he is also a little bit worried! All day long, Simon worries. He worries that he might not have a friend. He worries that he might not find the bathroom on time. Most of all, he worries that he will miss his mom. Luckily, Simon's mother has a plan to make the worries go away . . .

The Sea Hunt by Anna Burger

What’s the weirdest sea creature you’ve ever seen? Did it have fins, or tentacles, or a shell? Did it wriggle, or skitter, or stay still as a rock? Did it sting, or cling, or hide?

The Story of a Star by Ginny Umlauf Banister

The Story of a Star is a simple tale of how a lonely, misfit star finds his true and divine calling. This beautiful story also teaches an important lesson to both the young and old. Although we may feel different and apart from others, we are never alone, and we all have a special purpose in life.

What’s Under That Rock, Papa? by Dave Bauer

When Serea and Kai spend a weekend at their Grammy and Papa’s home, it’s always a time of discovery and fun! Join them as they encounter the wonders of backyard nature, from the microcosm of life under rocks and compost piles, to the joy of learning why thunder sounds scary and rain clouds are black.

Essay

A Better Man by Kelly Johnson

The journey from childhood to manhood is a momentous and often difficult time in every boy’s life. Never has this transition been more challenging than it is today. In addition to the perennial trials of peer pressure, hormones and popularity, young men must now grapple with a media-saturated culture that places enormous emphasis on physical appeal, material wealth and celebrity status.

A Moose’s History of North America by Walter and Frances Griggs

Walter and Frances Griggs recount North American history from early American colonies through the cold war in a clever collaboration that explores the iconic moose. With references ranging from biblical to poetic, the Griggs capture a long-forgotten side of North America--uncultivated forests, ruthless hunters, brave explorers, and heroic leaders, as well as a certain spirit of whimsy, wonder, and pride.

Neck Tales: Stories from Virginia’s Northern Neck by Thea Marshall

Join National Public Radio commentator Thea Marshall for a historic and contemporary journey through Virginia’s Northern Neck. First broadcast by Ms. Marshall on NPR, these stories paint a vivid portrait of this part of Virginia that’s a world apart—from the region’s wine, watermen and Chantey singers, to its poets, patriots, kings and citizens.

The Nature of Things: Stories from the Land by Rex Alphin

These brief, introspective essays about his life as a farmer in Isle of Wight, Virginia, Alphin captures the simple moments of country life with the candor, grace and old-fashioned wit of a master storyteller. He writes about the rich experience of being connected to the land, about the joy and beauty of the seasons, and about the importance of the small but profound moments in life overlooked by so many.

Fiction / Literature

A Love Letter: My Y Story, My Cancer Journey By Michael Roberts

The frightening grip of cancer uncovers strengths and weaknesses within the human spirit. For Ethan Clarke, a very personal battle with the disease reveals hidden demons that had been stifling his sexual identity and his connections with others. These demons had kept him from enjoying health and happiness and from accepting the healing powers of change.

A Perfect Madness by Frank H. Marsh

It is the autumn of 1938 when Julia Kaufmann meets Erich Schmidt while studying medicine at the German University in Prague. With Hitler’s army soon to invade the city and the terror of World War II looming, it is the worst of times for a Jew and a German to fall in love. As the excitement of the eugenics movement gives way to outright genocide, and the fear sweeping across Europe grows into madness, Julia and Erich find themselves forced to travel two very different paths—ones which will determine the fate of their love and, ultimately, the fate of their souls.

A Spy Among Us by Dorothy Fleming

et in the exotic and perilous Philippine Islands, A Spy Among Us follows the story of Major Jake (Mac) McCord, a brilliant intelligence officer commissioned by the United States Army in 1941 to capture a serial killer who has been terrorizing the small archipelago. Mac soon discovers that the killer is in fact the notorious Nazi spy Boris Meissner, who holds a deep-rooted grudge against Mac.

Code Name: Kaibigan by Dorothy Fleming

Kaibigan, a novel based on real events, takes place in the closing months of World War II as the Allies advance on the Japanese-occupied Philippines. Join Lieutenant Ben Adams, weapons and demolition expert, sent by the U.S. Navy ahead of the advancing Allies.

Coyote Summer by Margo Solod

For thirteen-year-old Jessie Silva, life on Bayberry Island is at its best in the summertime. That’s when the seasonal renters return to spend their vacations on the island, bringing with them Jessie’s best friend, Amanda. This year, though, change has come to Bayberry.

Hammond’s Choice by Bob Cohen

In Hammond’s Choice, Ruth and Larry Hammond have been forced to relinquish custody of their son, Tommy, in order to obtain intensive services for his serious emotional and behavioral problems. The Hammonds turn to Marty Fenton to discover what happened the night Tommy was accused of stabbing to death Kevin Landry, another resident at Possum Ridge School.

Labyrinth of Terror by Richard P. Wenzel

Terror reigns when a string of post-op infections erupts in the sanitized halls of King’s College Hospital in London. A trio of experts—Microbiology Professor Chris Rose, Jake Evans, an American infectious disease specialist, and Elizabeth Foster, a senior agent with M15—soon realize that the offending organism is a weapon in a worldwide terrorist plot.

Last Night in Managua by James Pendleton

Two men meet for the first time deep in a Nicaraguan jungle, one an American pilot and businessman, the other a gravely wounded Guatemalan pastor whose wife has been murdered by Somoza’s henchmen. Remarkable events have brought them both to this dangerous time and place.

Love and Other Illusions by Mariah Robinson

Enter the world of Jillian Barrister and those who orbit around her—Clay, David, Norma and Dr. Allison—players in a riveting drama of love and loss, happiness and anguish, innocence and guilt. It is Dr. Allison’s task to study and understand his patients through the process of analysis, and Jillian is no exception—or is she?

Making Manna by Eric Lotke

Libby Thompson is just fourteen years old when she flees her abusive home with her newborn son, Angel. Now they must build a life for themselves on hard work and low wages, dealing with police who are sometimes helpful—but not always—and a drug dealer who is full of surprises.

Nightman by James Pendleton

“Call me the night man. That’s what I am mostly. Course, I work some in the daytime, too, cleaning houses for my special customers—nice folks who live in a pretty part of town. But mainly I work at night…I’ve got keys to more offices and homes in this town than I can count.

Sister Sorrow, Sister Joy by Mariah Robinson

Ann shakes her head as if to clear it. “What exactly are we doing here?” “We’re playing, Ann. Playing like the little lost lambs in the parable. Don’t you like to play?” “I hate being lost and I like to know what I’m playing, Maggie.” “Let us be proper or die,” Maggie teases. “Junior League to the bone.”

The Bastard Year by Richard Lee Zuras

In the company of classic coming-of-age works, Richard Zuras’s debut novel tells the story of a boy’s final year of childhood and a family’s near disintegration. When Zain’s father is fired from the CIA in March of 1980, it creates a tremor that threatens to upend the family’s precarious balance.

The Great River Disclosure by Larry Holcombe

The elegant Great River Resort along the tranquil banks of the Great Wicomico River has a closely guarded secret. The beautiful resort sits atop a highly classified government facility known only to the President of the United States, a few high level government and military leaders, and resort owner Bill Russell.

The Honeymoon Corruption By Richard Lee Zuras

It’s the early 1960s, and while the Doo-wop era is ending, racial and class prejudice is alive and thriving in the American South. In this unforgiving environment, star-crossed young lovers Althea and Guy are determined to wed—despite the objections of Althea’s disapproving and powerful father.

The Private War of William Styron by Mary Wakefield Buxton

Returning to his childhood home in Virginia for the funeral of his stepmother, Elizabeth Buxton Styron, acclaimed writer William Styron finds himself plunged into boyhood reminiscence. He is “Billy” again, fourteen and heartbroken, with a mother recently passed from cancer and a grieving father who has fallen in love with the head nurse at the local hospital.

The Sylvan by Judy Witt

This beautiful story, illustrated with the author's mystical watercolors, revolves around a highly imaginative child named Sarah who discovers and befriends a wise, old man named Sylvania, who lives in a nearby forest.

The Woods of Wicomico by Nuala Galbari

During the hot, lazy days of summer, life in the woods of Wicomico is peaceful. Mukki the muskrat makes herbal teas, Cornelius the crow fruitlessly tries to take a midday nap, and young Timothy Trumble the tortoise marvels at the world around him.

Gardening

Early American Garden Bouquets by Julia Smith Berrall

In this expertly compiled and visually captivating history, Julia Smith Berrall traces the ever-changing relationship between Americans and their gardens from the 17th century through the Victorian era.

Health

A Call to Mind: A Story of Undiagnosed Childhood Traumatic Brain Injury by Claire Galloway

"It was so easy to conclude that my son was a sensitive and dreamy child, unadept at sports. I could not see that this was yet another piece of a puzzle, the full picture of which would show an injured brain. Luke would continue to provide clues over the next ten or so years, some subtle and some quite obvious. If only we had known what to look for..."

A Live Controversy: Autism and a Family’s Determination by Joseph and Roxana Hartmann

Roxana and Joseph Hartmann’s struggle for an equal education for their autistic child is as riveting as it is heart rending. For twenty years, they fought for their son, Mark, to be included in classrooms where he would not be treated differently because of his disability.

Broken Wings: What’s Wrong With Her? by Stephanie Fortune

Broken Wings: What’s Wrong With Her? is the inspirational story of Christina Fortune, who was born with and died from complications of cerebral palsy. In her brief twenty-four years, she lived as the gentle angel her devoted mother believed her to be.

Humanizing Prostate Cancer: A Physician-Patient Perspective by Roger E. Schultz, M.D., Physician and Alex W. Oliver, Patient

In this third edition of Humanizing Prostate Cancer, urologist Roger Schultz and prostate cancer survivor Alex W. Oliver continue their mission to help men and their families understand and cope with prostate cancer.

The Covered Smile: A True Story by Sonja Lauren

A smile is a terrible thing to hide.But a child whose teeth are missing or rotten will hesitate to show her ugly secret. She knows that her smile will elicit ridicule and astonishment, not a smile in return.

History

A Moose’s History of North America by Walter and Frances Griggs

Walter and Frances Griggs recount North American history from early American colonies through the cold war in a clever collaboration that explores the iconic moose. With references ranging from biblical to poetic, the Griggs capture a long-forgotten side of North America--uncultivated forests, ruthless hunters, brave explorers, and heroic leaders, as well as a certain spirit of whimsy, wonder, and pride.

Early American Garden Bouquets by Julia Smith Berrall

In this expertly compiled and visually captivating history, Julia Smith Berrall traces the ever-changing relationship between Americans and their gardens from the 17th century through the Victorian era.

Faith Beyond Belief: A Journey to Freedom by David Eberly

Faith Beyond Belief is a captivating testimony of personal faith by the senior Allied prisoner of the Gulf War. This dramatic recollection puts you in his F-15E cockpit when he was shot down in the Iraqi desert, evading the enemy, and held in the cells of Baghdad.

Legends From the Frosty Sons of Thunder by William Trall Doncaster, Jr

This work examines the legends and stories of nineteenth century Somerset County, Pennsylvania, and the Old Forbes Military Road, as shaped by two unforgettable events of 1889 that have forever characterized the region and its collective imagination: the controversial Nicely brothers murder trial and the devastating Johnstown Flood.

Neck Tales: Stories from Virginia’s Northern Neck by Thea Marshall

Join National Public Radio commentator Thea Marshall for a historic and contemporary journey through Virginia’s Northern Neck.

Northern Ireland: Can Sean and John Live in Peace? by Carol Daugherty Rasnic

Northern Ireland: Can Sean and John Live in Peace? explores the reasons for Northern Ireland’s so-called “Troubles.” In a compelling and detailed narrative, Professor Rasnic addresses two primary causes of the conflict—religion and politics—and the source of response to the Troubles: the law.

Patton’s Forward Observers by John Kurt Reith

More than any other military figure, General George S. Patton Jr. conjures up the image of the ultimate World War II American warrior, and even today, the Patton mystique continues to grow.

Richmond’s Unhealed History by Ben Campbell

In a detailed look at the history of Richmond, Benjamin Campbell examines the contradictions and crises that have formed the city over more than four centuries. Campbell argues that the community of metropolitan Richmond is engaged in a decisive spiritual battle in the coming decade.

Slow Dying: The Bosnian War Prison Camp at Visoko by Milenko S. Milanovic

Following the Bosnian War and his immigration to the U.S., Serbian refugee Milenko Milanovic would awaken from horrifying dreams—vestiges of his eight-month imprisonment in the Bosnian war camp at Visoko.

Soldier Pigs: When Soldiers Are Guinea Pigs by Gordon Swanson

During the 1950s, one special army quartermaster group was assigned the difficult but essential task of testing potential army materials—tests that often required putting soldiers at risk, challenging them at the top of their physical endurance, under the worst possible conditions.

The Life of “P”: A Memoir of a Mother and a Nurse by Lee Rice

The Life of “P” is the memoir of a mother and a nurse—an unsung hero from a small town in Virginia’s historic Northern Neck whose personal struggles, courage and heroic sacrifice should be remembered.

The Southern Cause by Thomas A. Daniel

n this powerful collection of over one hundred images and testimonies, award-winning photographer Thomas Daniel has documented the world of Civil War reenactors—men, women and children who recreate and relive one of the most turbulent and tragic periods in American history.

When Soldiers Cried: A True Story About Vietnam by David Shea

By the summer of 1967, the nation’s Selective Service System was fueling the largest military build-up since World War II. Hundreds of thousands of young men, many too young to legally drink and vote, were inducted to wage an ill-fated war in Vietnam.

Memoir/Autobiography

A Rose for Raymonde by Wade Foy

So begins A Rose for Raymonde, the true story of a young Swiss nurse who immigrated to the United States and found love with a U.S. Navy Reserve officer in 1950s New York. Complete with photographs and personal letters, this book chronicles their lives before their paths crossed and after.

Danger on My Doorstep: The Anita Flora Powitzer Story by Linda Schubert

Berlin had been safe for Anita Powitzer for as long as she could remember. But when Hitler came to power, everything changed. Now policemen harmed instead of helped, and Anita couldn’t even talk to her best friend. Flung from her secure childhood into a fearful world, she and her family had to find a way to flee Berlin before it was too late.

Honor Held Dear by Alan Eschbach

What motivates people to follow the lead of another person—to sometimes suppress their own fears, desires, and needs and to adopt a leader’s vision as their own? It’s a question that anyone in, or who aspires to, a leadership position should ask. In this uplifting and often humorous account, Captain Alan Eschbach, USN (Ret), reflects back on his life’s experiences, and how he used them to meld his own code of leadership, behavior, and ethics.

Living Happily Ever After—Separately by Lise Stryker Stoessel

If your marriage isn't working and you're contemplating divorce, there might be a gentler, less expensive way to reclaim your life and happiness--and renew your relationship. After twenty-three years of struggle, Lise Stoessel and her husband, Emil, knew they were fighting a losing battle.

My Dance with Grace by Weldon Bradshaw

Late in 2009, Weldon Bradshaw was diagnosed with primary sclerosing cholangitis, an incurable, autoimmune liver condition. Over the next two and a half years, as the disease progressed slowly and his liver and health deteriorated, his prognosis grew bleak. By November of 2012, his doctor informed him that if he didn’t receive a transplant, he’d be dead within the week.

Slow Dying: The Bosnian War Prison Camp at Visoko by Milenko S. Milanovic

Following the Bosnian War and his immigration to the U.S., Serbian refugee Milenko Milanovic would awaken from horrifying dreams—vestiges of his eight-month imprisonment in the Bosnian war camp at Visoko.

The Braying Donkey: Reflections on a Life by Dr. Timir Banerjee

With his father, one uncle, and maternal grandfather all working as doctors in India, Timir Banerjee knew early in life that he was destined for a career in medicine. It is ironic, therefore, that a major theme of The Braying Donkey, Banerjee’s loosely organized collection of memoirs and inspirational thoughts, is his lifelong quest for identity and self-fulfillment against the unforgiving forces of social convention, discrimination, and the random circumstances of birth.

The Life of “P”: A Memoir of a Mother and a Nurse by Lee Rice

The Life of “P” is the memoir of a mother and a nurse—an unsung hero from a small town in Virginia’s historic Northern Neck whose personal struggles, courage and heroic sacrifice should be remembered.

The Nature of Things: Stories from the Land by Rex Alphin

In these brief, introspective essays about his life as a farmer in Isle of Wight, Virginia, Alphin captures the simple moments of country life with the candor, grace and old-fashioned wit of a master storyteller.

When Soldiers Cried: A True Story About Vietnam by David Shea

By the summer of 1967, the nation’s Selective Service System was fueling the largest military build-up since World War II. Hundreds of thousands of young men, many too young to legally drink and vote, were inducted to wage an ill-fated war in Vietnam.

Writing Our Way Out: Memoirs from Jail by David Coogan

Detailing the formative and transformative memories of ten men, Writing Our Way Out is the creative culmination of a writing class that began in the Richmond City Jail in Virginia, and grew into a journey to re-entry.

Military History

Faith Beyond Belief: A Journey to Freedom by David Eberly

Faith Beyond Belief is a captivating testimony of personal faith by the senior Allied prisoner of the Gulf War. This dramatic recollection puts you in his F-15E cockpit when he was shot down in the Iraqi desert, evading the enemy, and held in the cells of Baghdad.

Patton’s Forward Observers by John Kurt Reith

More than any other military figure, General George S. Patton Jr. conjures up the image of the ultimate World War II American warrior, and even today, the Patton mystique continues to grow.

Slow Dying: The Bosnian War Prison Camp at Visoko by Milenko S. Milanovic

Following the Bosnian War and his immigration to the U.S., Serbian refugee Milenko Milanovic would awaken from horrifying dreams—vestiges of his eight-month imprisonment in the Bosnian war camp at Visoko.

Soldier Pigs: When Soldiers Are Guinea Pigs by Gordon Swanson

During the 1950s, one special army quartermaster group was assigned the difficult but essential task of testing potential army materials—tests that often required putting soldiers at risk, challenging them at the top of their physical endurance, under the worst possible conditions.

The Southern Cause by Thomas A. Daniel

In this powerful collection of over one hundred images and testimonies, award-winning photographer Thomas Daniel has documented the world of Civil War reenactors—men, women and children who recreate and relive one of the most turbulent and tragic periods in American history.

When Soldiers Cried: A True Story About Vietnam

By the summer of 1967, the nation’s Selective Service System was fueling the largest military build-up since World War II. Hundreds of thousands of young men, many too young to legally drink and vote, were inducted to wage an ill-fated war in Vietnam.

Wolf at the Door by James R. Powell

“Homeland security” of the Virginia coastline was breached during World War II—or was it? In Wolf at the Door: The World War II Antisubmarine Battle for Hampton Roads, authors James R. Powell and Dr. Alan B. Flanders describe how the US Navy developed the Antisubmarine Warfare Program to assure American control of the eastern shoreline.

Nature

A Moose’s History of North America by Walter and Frances Griggs

Walter and Frances Griggs recount North American history from early American colonies through the cold war in a clever collaboration that explores the iconic moose. With references ranging from biblical to poetic, the Griggs capture a long-forgotten side of North America--uncultivated forests, ruthless hunters, brave explorers, and heroic leaders, as well as a certain spirit of whimsy, wonder, and pride.

Early American Garden Bouquets by Julia Smith Berrall

In this expertly compiled and visually captivating history, Julia Smith Berrall traces the ever-changing relationship between Americans and their gardens from the 17th century through the Victorian era. Stroll down her garden path to traverse the distance between the utilitarian plots of the early colonial settlers and the elaborate banquet-hall centerpieces of the late 19th century.

Goshen Revisited by Jack and Judy Witt

In this second book on Goshen Pass, Jack and Judy Witt combine forces again to revel in their love of each other and this land along Virginia’s Maury River.

The Chief and I by Karen Tootelian

In the summer of 2002, writer/environmentalist Karen Tootelian began caring for the 89-year-old Chief of the Mattaponi Tribe, Webster Little Eagle Custalow. What began as her personal journals evolved into a book about their deep friendship and compassion for one another.

The Nature of Things: Stories from the Land by Rex Alphin

In these brief, introspective essays about his life as a farmer in Isle of Wight, Virginia, Alphin captures the simple moments of country life with the candor, grace and old-fashioned wit of a master storyteller.

The Woods of Wicomico by Nuala C. Galbari

During the hot, lazy days of summer, life in the woods of Wicomico is peaceful. Mukki the muskrat makes herbal teas, Cornelius the crow fruitlessly tries to take a midday nap, and young Timothy Trumble the tortoise marvels at the world around him.

Photography

The Southern Cause by Thomas A. Daniel

In this powerful collection of over one hundred images and testimonies, award-winning photographer Thomas Daniel has documented the world of Civil War reenactors—men, women and children who recreate and relive one of the most turbulent and tragic periods in American history.

Wildlife’s Greatest Connection by Ken Conger

Throughout his life, award-winning wildlife photographer Ken Conger has visited dozens of national parks and wildlife refuges, documenting the candid behaviors of wildlife in their natural habitats.

Poetry

Creeping Thyme by Ron Pies, M.D.

This collection of works offers a rare journey through the poet’s experience as a psychiatrist and as a man. Each poem in this collection has its “depth, space/and flowering height,” as do the hyacinth and late tulip that Pies tends in his garden.

Goshen Revisited by Jack and Judy Witt

In this second book on Goshen Pass, Jack and Judy Witt combine forces again to revel in their love of each other and this land along Virginia’s Maury River.

Goshen: Lessons from the River by Jack and Judy Witt

The first in a series of works by Jack and Judy Witt, Goshen: Lessons From the Rivercelebrates the natural beauty of Goshen Pass, along Virginia’s Maury River, and the powerful spiritual influence it has.

Raining Words: Poetry and Writings by Rikki Stapleton

Raining Words is a collection of selected writings from the 1960s until 2004, and like its author, this collection is an eclectic personal anthology of poems, essays, letters and jottings—observations of life and people she knew who challenged and moved her, letters, sometimes intimate, and other writings that her mother chose to collect and publish posthumously.

Set Down Here by Lolette Kuby

Writing with fluid grace, Lolette Kuby has accomplished in her first volume of poetry “a happy union of body, mind and spirit.” What distinguishes this collection are both Kuby’s fusion of small details with big subjects and her confessions of doubt interspersed with leaps of faith.

Sunset Sonata by Robert Johnson

Robert Johnson’s voice resonates like a wise old teacher sharing his simple, worldly wisdom. He speaks about the natural world, the preciousness of life, and about innocence, but also about injustice, loss, human frailties, and the menace of terrorism, withholding nothing.

Politics

The Fourth Branch of Government: We the People by Jack Trammell, PhD and Guy Terrell, MS, PMP

With the explosion of social media and the Internet, practically everyone in America has instant access to the news and a greater ability to follow what is happening anywhere.  As a result, we are a culture and a nation that is bombarded with information.  However, we are coping poorly with that assault and using an outdated framework for our governance.  Many people feel disconnected from the very mechanisms and people who are supposed to represent their interests.  The Fourth Branch of Government is about updating the framework of our democracy.  It is a movement whose time has come, and one that the Founding Fathers envisioned.

Relationships

A Better Man by Kelly Johnson

The journey from childhood to manhood is a momentous and often difficult time in every boy’s life. Never has this transition been more challenging than it is today.

Living Happily Ever After—Separately by Lise Stryker Stoessel

If your marriage isn't working and you're contemplating divorce, there might be a gentler, less expensive way to reclaim your life and happiness--and renew your relationship.

Religion

Flying Free: Life After Crisis by Dean Rush

In this thoughtful guide to dealing with life’s challenges, Pastor Dean Rush offers wise, spiritual counsel to men, women and families facing dramatic and often unexpected change in their lives.

To Err is Human: A Collection of Forgiveness Readings by Inez Tuck

Forgiveness helps to heal wounds and build bridges. It is beneficial to a person’s health and well-being, and aids in healing the injustices and misunderstandings of life. Why, then, is it often difficult to put into practice?

Self-help

A Live Controversy: Autism and a Family’s Determination by Roxana and Joseph Hartmann

Roxana and Joseph Hartmann’s struggle for an equal education for their autistic child is as riveting as it is heart rending. For twenty years, they fought for their son, Mark, to be included in classrooms where he would not be treated differently because of his disability.

Flying Free: Life After Crisis by Dean Rush

In this thoughtful guide to dealing with life’s challenges, Pastor Dean Rush offers wise, spiritual counsel to men, women and families facing dramatic and often unexpected change in their lives.

Living Happily Ever After—Separately by Lise Stryker Stoessel

If your marriage isn't working and you're contemplating divorce, there might be a gentler, less expensive way to reclaim your life and happiness--and renew your relationship.

The Story of a Star by Ginny Umlauf Banister

The Story of a Star is a simple tale of how a lonely, misfit star finds his true and divine calling. This beautiful story also teaches an important lesson to both the young and old.

The Wondrous Wizdom of Oz: A Spiritual Odyssey by Christine Whitehead

Dorothy and Toto’s incredible journey home never grows old. But where, exactly, is home? In The Wondrous Wizdom of Oz: A Spiritual Odyssey, Christine Whitehead teaches us that our own yellow brick road can lead us home to a world of discovery, joy, and personal fulfillment.

Young Adult /Middle Grade

Coyote Summer by Margo Solod

For thirteen-year-old Jessie Silva, life on Bayberry Island is at its best in the summertime. That’s when the seasonal renters return to spend their vacations on the island, bringing with them Jessie’s best friend, Amanda. This year, though, change has come to Bayberry.

Danger on My Doorstep: The Anita Flora Powitzer Story by Linda Schubert

Berlin had been safe for Anita Powitzer for as long as she could remember. But when Hitler came to power, everything changed. Now policemen harmed instead of helped, and Anita couldn't even talk to her best friend. Flung from her secure childhood into a fearful world, she and her family had to find a way to flee Berlin before it was too late.

Friday Adventure by PV Jackson

It’s been years since Kate and Grace went on their last “Friday Adventure” with Dad, wandering around Richmond, doing interesting things, and having fun. Since their father passed away, the sisters have left home to lead their own lives. Kate is studying biology in Costa Rica, and Grace is busy at college. Neither has much time to spend with family. . .or to mourn.

The Defenders: Bully Patrol by William and Monika Carter

It’s the first day of a new school year, and Tommy’s little brother Matthew is just starting kindergarten. Tommy can’t wait to show him the ropes. But when some older kids start picking on Matthew, Tommy knows Matthew needs more than a big brother: he needs a defender.

The Sylvan by Judy Witt

This beautiful story, illustrated with the author's mystical watercolors, revolves around a highly imaginative child named Sarah who discovers and befriends a wise, old man named Sylvania, who lives in a nearby forest. Sarah and Sylvania take the reader on their fantastical journey as they learn the secrets of life.

The Woods of Wicomico by Nuala Galbari

During the hot, lazy days of summer, life in the woods of Wicomico is peaceful. Mukki the muskrat makes herbal teas, Cornelius the crow fruitlessly tries to take a midday nap, and young Timothy Trumble the tortoise marvels at the world around him. But when humans plan to build a new development in their woodland, the community of animals springs into action to save their homes.